[syndicated profile] macrumors_feed

Posted by Juli Clover

With the new LTE Series 3 Apple Watches now out in the wild, we got our hands on one of the new devices to give MacRumors readers a closer look at its design, features, and improvements compared to previous-generation Apple Watch models.

In the video below, we took a look at one of the new 42mm Aluminum Sport models connected to the AT&T network.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

Design wise, the new Apple Watch LTE models are almost identical to the Series 2 models, with the exception of a 0.25mm thicker back glass that houses the heart rate sensors and the glaringly red Digital Crown that denotes its LTE status.

That red Digital Crown definitely stands out, and it's kind of a love it or hate it aspect of the new Apple Watch.

Inside, the Apple Watch Series 3 is sporting an upgraded S3 processor, and this thing is fast. It's noticeably quicker than the Series 2 Apple Watch and if you're coming from a Series 0 or a Series 1, you're going to see some serious speed gains.

Quite a few new LTE Apple Watch owners have been running into activation issues trying to get their new devices set up, but we had no problems getting it connected to the AT&T network and up and running. When using cellular, it's going to drain a decent amount of battery, so while this watch can work without an iPhone, you're still going to want one around at least some of the time.

The Series 3 Apple Watch can be purchased from the online Apple Store and Apple retail stores around the world starting today. There are both LTE and non-LTE models available, with LTE models starting at $399 and non-LTE models starting at $329. LTE models are largely sold out and harder to come by, so you may need to wait a few weeks to get your hands on one.

Related Roundups: Apple Watch, watchOS 4
Buyer's Guide: Apple Watch (Buy Now)

Discuss this article in our forums

Crisis on Infinite Earths #1

Sep. 23rd, 2017 03:23 am
[personal profile] history79 posting in [community profile] scans_daily



"While writing Green Lantern I received a letter from a fan asking about a mixup in DC continuity. In my reply I said, “One day we (meaning the DC editorial we) will probably straighten up what is in the DC Universe ... and what is outside.” At this point in its history DC Comics had Earth-One, Earth-Two, Earth-Three, Earth-B, etc. There were super-heroes on each Earth and though old-time readers had no problem understanding DC continuity, it proved off-putting to new readers who suddenly discovered there was not one but three Supermans, Wonder Womans, Batmans, etc."

- Marv Wolfman


Read more... )

Star Trek Novel Icons

Sep. 22nd, 2017 06:17 pm
sheliak: A mermaid stares in fascination down a chasm in the ocean floor, through which an underwater city is visible. (trot)
[personal profile] sheliak posting in [community profile] fandom_icons


20 Star Trek: Rihannsu icons and 55 other Star Trek TOS book cover icons over here.

Star Trek Novel Icons

Sep. 22nd, 2017 06:17 pm
sheliak: Handwoven tapestry of the planet Jupiter. (Default)
[personal profile] sheliak posting in [community profile] icons


20 Star Trek: Rihannsu icons and 55 other Star Trek TOS book cover icons over here.
sovay: (Otachi: Pacific Rim)
[personal profile] sovay
In about an hour, I am going to see Howard the Duck (1986) on 70 mm at the Somerville Theatre. It's part of their second annual 70 mm & Widescreen Festival, which started this Wednesday and runs through the rest of the month; last year it offered me such superlative viewing experiences as Richard Brooks' Lord Jim (1965), Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus (1960), Disney's Sleeping Beauty (1959) and Steven Lisberger's Tron (1982), and this year I am starting with a duck from another planet. We're meeting my parents for it. My father unironically loves Howard the Duck. He ranks it with '80's cult classics like W.D. Richter's The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension (1984) and has always felt it deserved a sequel. I have not seen it since high school at the latest and have peculiarly fragmentary memories of the plot. The opening sequence is picture-clear: Howard on his home planet greeting a Playduck centerfold with "My little airbrushed beauty!" before being sucked through space and time into Cleveland, Ohio where he rescues a new wave chick from some muggers with the ancient martial art of "Quack Fu." She has a band. I want to say he ends up managing it. After that things start to break up. I remember that an eldritch thing possesses Jeffrey Jones—and that it happens for the decently Lovecraftian reason that it is never a bright idea to open a door at random into the deep reaches of space when you don't know what might be on the other side—but I don't remember the mechanism or the immediate consequences, except that I have the vague sense of a road trip. I remember that Chip Zien voices Howard, when I know him much better for his work in musical theater. IMDb tells me that this movie was also the first place I saw Lea Thompson and Tim Robbins. I'm really looking forward. Other films I am planning to catch on 70 mm include Patty Jenkins' Wonder Woman (2017) and Joseph L. Mankiewicz's Cleopatra (1963), which should really be something on a big screen, as should an IB Technicolor VistaVision print of Hitchcock's North by Northwest (1959). I am a little sorry to have missed The Dark Crystal (1982) earlier this evening, but it has been a long and stressful day. There's always the matinée repeat on Sunday if I really feel like it. In the meantime, there's a space duck.
[syndicated profile] macrumors_feed

Posted by Juli Clover

It's officially iPhone launch day, and MacRumors videographer Matt stopped by the Palo Alto Apple Store this morning to pick up some new products to test out. After running into Apple CEO Tim Cook and COO Jeff Williams, who were also hanging around the store, Matt walked away with a Space Gray iPhone 8 and a Gold iPhone 8 Plus.

Matt went hands-on with both products to give MacRumors readers still on the fence about purchasing a chance to see them up close.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

Apple's Gold iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are using a new shade of the color that's almost a meld of last year's Gold and Rose Gold shades. It's a rosier color with more red in it than past iPhone models, and it looks great paired with the glass body. The Space Gray is a darker shade that's almost similar to the Matte Black of the iPhone 7, and it too looks great with that shiny glass finish.

Because of the glass body, the iPhone 8 and the iPhone 8 Plus are heavier than past iPhones, but at the same time, easier to hold, both due to small thickness increases and the grip of the glass itself.

With the new speaker enhancements, the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus are loud, and the True Tone display looks different, but it's not a major change over previous-generation devices.

Apple's iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are available for purchase starting today online and in Apple retail stores around the world. The iPhone 8 starts at $699, while the iPhone 8 Plus starts at $799.

Related Roundup: iPhone 8
Buyer's Guide: iPhone (Buy Now)

Discuss this article in our forums

laceblade: (With Friends Like These)
[personal profile] laceblade posting in [community profile] podsaveamerica
This week we get more Weedsy than The Weeds about America’s uniquely f****d up health care system with single-payer activist and Chapo wonk Timothy Faust ([twitter.com profile] crulge), an incredibly fun and energetic tour of health care with two people who curse a lot. First, how we got here (Otto von Bismarck comes up); then, why the latest GOP attempt to repeal Obamacare is their worst yet; and finally, an examination of Bernie Sanders’ “refreshingly ambitious” Medicare For All bill — prefaced with a friendly reminder that the most socialist-y parts of the ACA were the most popular.

Relevant to the discussion: A Plan to Win Universal Health Care by Timothy Faust

And check out Tim’s podcast Heavy Medical and newsletter.
You can also find him on the Chapo Trap House podcast, or catch him touring fifteen cities between NYC and Minneapolis in mid-October to talk single-payer with local DSA chapters, open to the public. Get in touch!

THIS WEEKEND is our LIVE SHOW in AUSTIN, TX: 9/23 at the Texas Tribune Festival.

Get the pod here or wherever you get your podcasts.
[syndicated profile] boingboing_full_feed

Posted by Xeni Jardin

The Department of Homeland Security today revealed which states were targeted by Russian hackers trying to break into voting systems during the 2016 election cycle. DHS said "most" states were unsuccessfully attacked, but didn't make clear how and where the hackers were successful, or whether the sustained cyberattacks helped Donald Trump win the presidency.

https://twitter.com/APEastRegion/status/911338483779850240 https://twitter.com/ditzkoff/status/911347055599210497

Earlier in 2017, DHS disclosed it had evidence of Russia-backed hacks against 21 states, but wouldn't tell the individual states if they'd been targeted--which upset state officials who wanted to protect those systems if compromised. DHS officials said at that time they instead informed the entities who had "ownership" of those systems, which might mean local election offices or voting technology systems vendors.

https://twitter.com/ericgeller/status/911334297717501952

State election officials finally got the news directly from federal authorities on Friday.

From NPR:

On Friday afternoon, DHS placed individual calls to the top election official in each state and six U.S. territories to fill them in on what information the agency has about election hacking attempts in their state last year. It will be up to the election officials to decide whether to share what they learn with the public.

Shortly after the call , Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman announced that her state's election systems were among those that Russian hackers tried to break into last year, but that they had failed. "There was no successful intrusion and we immediately alerted the Federal Bureau of Investigation of the activities," she said in a statement.

Wyman says the state had security measures in place that detected the attempted intrusion.

The Connecticut Secretary of State's office said that DHS confirmed Russian hackers tried to break into the state's online voter registration system last year, but did not succeed. A spokesman for the office said their IT department detected and blocked the attempted intrusion, but did not know who was probing the system.

Officials in Oregon and Wisconsin also said they were targeted.

In addition, officials from Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania and Virginia told The Associated Press that their states had been targeted.

Election officials in Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, New Mexico and North Carolina said their states were not targeted by hackers.

https://twitter.com/ditzkoff/status/911339181661663232 https://twitter.com/nycsouthpaw/status/911345487223148544 https://twitter.com/yashar/status/911324095991762944 https://twitter.com/dnvolz/status/911336261062885376 https://twitter.com/fbajak/status/911352160662753280 https://twitter.com/Shareblue/status/911344272137494531 https://twitter.com/JoshSchwerin/status/911343761854222336

PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump looks up during his meeting with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas during the U.N. General Assembly in New York, U.S., September 20, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

[syndicated profile] boingboing_full_feed

Posted by Xeni Jardin

Who's paying for the attorneys representing President Donald Trump in the federal probe of Russian election interference? His legal defense is in part funded through a Republican Party account with a number of rich donors. Among them are a “billionaire investor, a property developer seeking U.S. government visas and a Ukrainian-born American who has made billions of dollars doing business with Russian oligarchs,” reports the WSJ. Oh, and there's a Rosneft connection, you Putin conspiracy hounds.

The RNC account in question has been historically used to pay for the RNC's own legal bills, but just last month paid over $300,000 to help cover Trump’s personal legal expenses, Federal Election Commission filings reveal.

Oh, and that same fund also paid about $200,000 to attorneys representing the President's dumbest son, Don Jr.

From Rebecca Ballhaus at the Wall Street Journal,

In April, billionaire Len Blavatnik gave $12,700 to the RNC’s legal fund, on top of donations of about $200,000 to other RNC accounts. He also gave the legal fund $100,000 in 2016, according to FEC filings.

The contribution from Mr. Blavatnik came during the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s probe of U.S. intelligence agencies’ findings of Russian meddling in the U.S. election, a month before the Justice Department appointed a special counsel to oversee its probe of Russian interference—which subsequently prompted Mr. Trump to hire a private legal team.

Moscow has denied interfering in the election. Mr. Trump has denied his campaign colluded with Russia and called the investigations a “witch hunt.”

A spokesman for Mr. Blavatnik didn’t return a request for comment. The White House referred questions to the RNC.

Mr. Blavatnik, who was born in Ukraine when it was part of the Soviet Union, and moved to the U.S. in his early 20s, amassed his fortune in Russia in the years following the collapse of the Soviet Union.

He is a longtime business partner of Viktor Vekselberg, who is one of the richest men in Russia and has close ties to the Kremlin.

In 2013, Mr. Blavatnik earned billions when he, Mr. Vekselberg and two other partners sold their stake in the oil company TNK-BP to Rosneft, a Kremlin-controlled oil company. Rosneft’s chief executive is Igor Sechin, a top ally of Russian President Vladmir Putin.

During the 2016 campaign, Mr. Blavatnik through his company donated to several Republican presidential campaigns, including for Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham. He didn’t donate to Mr. Trump’s campaign.

[HT: Southpaw]

[syndicated profile] kottke_org_feed

Posted by Jason Kottke

Arizona Senator John McCain has publicly come out against the latest Republican attempt to repeal the ACA. His statement begins:

As I have repeatedly stressed, health care reform legislation ought to be the product of regular order in the Senate. Committees of jurisdiction should mark up legislation with input from all committee members, and send their bill to the floor for debate and amendment. That is the only way we might achieve bipartisan consensus on lasting reform, without which a policy that affects one-fifth of our economy and every single American family will be subject to reversal with every change of administration and congressional majority.

I would consider supporting legislation similar to that offered by my friends Senators Graham and Cassidy were it the product of extensive hearings, debate and amendment. But that has not been the case. Instead, the specter of September 30th budget reconciliation deadline has hung over this entire process.

Many opponents of the ACA repeal are hailing McCain as a hero for going against his party leadership on this issue. I don’t see it — he’d still support a bill like Graham-Cassidy that would take away healthcare coverage from millions of Americans if only it were the result of proper procedure — particularly because of what he says next (italics mine):

We should not be content to pass health care legislation on a party-line basis, as Democrats did when they rammed Obamacare through Congress in 2009.

This is false. The NY Times’ David Leonhardt explained back in March during another Republican repeal effort:

When Barack Obama ran for president, he faced a choice. He could continue moving the party to the center or tack back to the left. The second option would have focused on government programs, like expanding Medicare to start at age 55. But Obama and his team thought a plan that mixed government and markets — farther to the right of Clinton’s — could cover millions of people and had a realistic chance of passing.

They embarked on a bipartisan approach. They borrowed from Mitt Romney’s plan in Massachusetts, gave a big role to a bipartisan Senate working group, incorporated conservative ideas and won initial support from some Republicans. The bill also won over groups that had long blocked reform, like the American Medical Association.

But congressional Republicans ultimately decided that opposing any bill, regardless of its substance, was in their political interest. The consultant Frank Luntz wrote an influential memo in 2009 advising Republicans to talk positively about “reform” while also opposing actual solutions. McConnell, the Senate leader, persuaded his colleagues that they could make Obama look bad by denying him bipartisan cover.

Adam Jentleson, former Deputy Chief of Staff for Senator Harry Reid, said basically the same thing on Twitter:

The votes were party-line, but that was a front manufactured by McConnell. He bragged about it at the time. McConnell rarely gives much away but he let the mask slip here, saying he planned to oppose Obamacare regardless of what was in the bill. Those who worked on and covered the bill know there were GOP senators who wanted to support ACA — but McConnell twisted their arms. On Obamacare, Democrats spent months holding hearings and seeking GOP input — we accepted 200+ GOP amendments!

For reference, here was the Senate vote, straight down party lines. Hence the “ramming” charge…if you didn’t know any better. Luckily, Snopes does know better.

According to Mark Peterson, chair of the UCLA Department of Public Policy, one easy metric by which to judge transparency is the number of hearings held during the development of a bill, as well as the different voices heard during those hearings. So far, the GOP repeal efforts have been subject to zero public hearings.

In contrast, the ACA was debated in three House committees and two Senate committees, and subject to hours of bipartisan debate that allowed for the introduction of amendments. Peterson told us in an e-mail that he “can’t recall any major piece of legislation that was completely devoid of public forums of any kind, and that were crafted outside of the normal committee and subcommittee structure to this extent”.

The Wikipedia page about the ACA tells much the same story.

Tags: Adam Jentleson   David Leonhardt   John McCain   healthcare   politics
tassosss: (Default)
[personal profile] tassosss
And speaking of slogging along. I mean, I love this series and I'm glad I've got some momentum on it, but it has been work to get it going again.

Sunday Dinner: Melissa (2312 words) by Tassos
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Teen Wolf (TV)
Rating: General Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Characters: Sheriff Stilinski, Melissa McCall
Additional Tags: Werewolf Sheriff Stilinski, Dinner, Friendship, Male-Female Friendship, Conversations, Alternate Universe - Canon Divergence
Series: Part 6 of Lycanthropic Optics: Werewolf!Sheriff AU
Summary:

John bumps into Melissa at the hospital. They have a long overdue chat.


charisstoma: (Default)
[personal profile] charisstoma
Me today -- these of course are Pallas or Manul cats.
https://www.boredpanda.com/pallas-cat-manul-funny-face-expressive/

Pallas cat

More of them and as the day wore on-- please note no dead bodies resulted


Pallas cat 2
Pallas cat 3
Pallas cat4
Pallas cat 5
Pallas cat 6
Pallas cat 7
Pallas 8
Pallas cat 8

writing is a thing again

Sep. 22nd, 2017 07:19 pm
tassosss: (Default)
[personal profile] tassosss
So you know I've been complaining for months about how writing is like pulling teeth? I've been slogging along, working on finishing half finished things (and succeeding), poking at a couple new ideas that haven't stuck, and it's all felt like work and drudgery. Until, this week. When I started an Avvar!Cullen/mage!Trevelyan romance that is all about the dubcon and in basically two sittings have gotten out 5,000 words.

Let's back up. I've basically been writing a little over 5k words a month this year, with some variation, and definitely not in two days. And it wasn't even hard! What is that even? Writing? Not a painful exercise? (Sidenote: on top of that writing at work has been pretty good this week too...)

So, yeah, writing is suddenly fun again. Also, witness me be incredibly uncomfortable writing my own kinks. I mean, lbr, this is an idfic romance at the moment (though with my usual over thinking of how to make the situation work). It's also basically the first part of 7 Brides for 7 Brothers, which makes me feel a little weird 'cause I don't actually like the movie, but, man, I sure as hell love Avvar!AUs, and forced closeness, and bedsharing, and a marriage of convenience, and ALL THE SILLY TROPES. I just prefer reading them to writing them. So I'm trying something new here. It'll help me grow as a person.

Anyway, I'm already worried about finishing it. This is the same feeling I've gotten starting the other three novel length fics that are about half done at ~60k. I'm hoping this one won't be that long. And that I finish it. Wish me luck.

Meme Time!

Sep. 22nd, 2017 06:14 pm
alisanne: (Default)
[personal profile] alisanne
Stolen from [livejournal.com profile] lijahlover ages ago!
I am doing it now to distract myself from the fact I haven't been able to come up with anything for this week's [community profile] hogwarts365. :((

Anyway, below the cut at my childhood crushes:
Wow I was a nerd )

So, who were your childhood idols/crushes growing up?
Tell me! Distract me from my no-writing slump!

Also, I tag...[personal profile] lilyseyes, [personal profile] torino10154, [livejournal.com profile] sassy_cissa, [livejournal.com profile] akatnamedeaster, [personal profile] adafrog, [personal profile] capitu, [livejournal.com profile] enchanted_jae, [livejournal.com profile] brumeier, and [personal profile] digthewriter. *g*

2191 / Fic - Star Wars

Sep. 22nd, 2017 07:25 pm
siria: (sw - rey and bb8)
[personal profile] siria
crouched on one knee in the dark
Rogue One | ~1300 words | Chirrut/Baze | Thanks to [personal profile] trinityofone for betaing.

(Also on AO3)

When Baze had believed, that belief had been a thing grounded in soil and stone. )

this week. month. season.

Sep. 22nd, 2017 04:20 pm
jazzfish: Jazz Fish: beret, sunglasses, saxophone (Default)
[personal profile] jazzfish
The weekend was alright-to-good. I'd moved my dentist appointment to Monday from the middle of next week, and that went fine except for some gumwork that I'll need to have done in a couple of weeks. Then come Tuesday night the stress stacked up again. Emily's successfully located a subleaser, at least for a couple of months: yay! I won't have to pay half the mortgage in addition to Vancouver rent, and I might even not be dipping into savings. At least for that couple of months.

Trouble was, the subleaser wanted in on 1 October, and I was scheduled to leave Thursday evening and not get back 'til next Sunday. The first. Panic ... did not exactly set in, though stress certainly did.

Over the course of Wednesday I:
  • Got a couple of friends to hang out with me Wednesday night and help finish packing, which otherwise would have been a) slow, b) frustrating, and c) generally sad-inducing.
  • Acquired a small storage unit on short notice.
  • Decided to just call in exhausted on Thursday due to not sleeping well (this is not a lie), and just go in for my early-morning meetings.
So that happened and the packing went fine, and the move itself went fine. I left the bookcases and coffee-table there for the subleaser's use; the bookcases might fit into the storage unit if necessary. I'd intended to find myself a new better bed and move the old one to the condo so the subleaser could use it but given my state the last week or so, finding a decent bed was Not Happening. I'll throw money at Emily to find a bed. And then I guess I'll have two low-end beds.



After all that I made it back to my basement apartment about an hour before I'd expected, with plenty of time to pack for ten days up north. Indeed, I managed to leave about an hour early to get to the airport, so I'd have plenty of time to grab a leisurely dinner before my flight.

Except that when I got to the airport I realised I'd forgotten my viola, which would make it difficult to a) practise and b) have a Skype lesson on Tuesday. So, half an hour transit back out to the apartment and half an hour back to the airport, and there went all the extra time I'd built in for dinner. I did manage to grab something to eat anyhow but it was a close thing.

I then discovered, once I got here, that I'd left my glasses at home as well. This is deeply frustrating, as it rather limits my late-evening options. It's also gonna make things interesting if my contacts self-destruct again.

(I briefly thought I had lost my Nexus card, but it turned up again. Still not sure what happened there. I'd blame my lack of glasses except that I generally find things by touch and not by sight, so.)



But the weekend was pretty good: reconnected with Erin, went out to a couple of events to start trying to make connections in the local kink community, generally got a little more sociable and a little less stuck in my own head.

And today's the equinox, so maybe the horrificness has just been the fault of summer and it'll start to settle out now. I can hope, anyway.

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