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If I'm honest with you, I'm probably much too close to this book to have a fair opinion of it. On the other hand, it's a gorgeous, loving, clear-eyed and critical portrait of the world in which I live. In a week that felt hopeless, this book gave me a beautiful and hopeful place to be, and I adored it without reservation.
Powell’s Books beckoned to us in red, black, and white, like a flag for a new America. One that’s educated, homegrown, and all about sustaining local book culture.

Libraries are where nerds like me go to refuel. They are safe-havens where the polluted noise of the outside world, with all the bullies and bro-dudes and anti-feminist rhetoric, is shut out. Libraries have zero tolerance for bullshit. Their walls protect us and keep us safe from all the bastards that have never read a book for fun.

Juliet is a fat 19yo Puerto Rican lesbian writer from the Bronx, spending her summer in Portland, Oregon, interning with Harlowe Brisbane, the white feminist author of Raging Flower: Empowering your Pussy by Empowering your Mind. Shenanigans ensue, and they are gloriously, heartbreakingly real: a science fiction writing workshop honoring Octavia Butler; a reading at Powell's that goes horribly wrong; a queer POC party in Miami.

Rivera is brilliant on the rollercoaster that is growing up one or more kinds of "other" and trying to be true to your authentic self before you have quite figured out what that is.
You are your own person, Juliet. If it’s a phase, so what? If it’s your whole life, who cares? You’re destined to evolve and understand yourself in ways you never imagined before.

She is also extremely acute on the specific failures of white feminism. At a moment in history when our alliances may or may not save the world, it's on white women to understand how our thoughtlessness can inflict deep injuries on our best allies. And it's on white women to stop that shit.

This is a first novel and unpolished, but it's a huge shiny diamond full of light and color and my favorite thing I've read in the challenge so far.

2 links 17 August 2017

Aug. 17th, 2017 11:15 pm
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Eric Deggans on NPR (All Things Considered):

Netflix, ABC Portrayals Of Autism Still Fall Short, Critics Say

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/08/11/542668400/netflix-abc-portrayals-of-autism-still-fall-short-critics-say

You can read or listen to this piece, which is about "The Good Doctor" and "Atypical".
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Ian McEwan's acclaimed novels On Chesil Beach and Saturday both take place over the course of a single day, in an improbably lily-white version of England. Race-bending this formula is the fundamentally good idea beneath Black Bread White Beer. When we meet Amal and his white wife Claud, they have just lost a pregnancy in the first trimester, but they go ahead and visit Claud's parents in East Sussex as planned.

The novel is at its sharpest and funniest when Amal is reporting his Pakistani parents' reactions to his horrible in-laws:
‘What she means is, we wish you all the luck in the world, Amal, but you must watch your back. Her people look like a bunch of backstabbers. Never trust them for an instant.’

There are also some moving passages where Amal imagines what he and Claud would be like as parents:
Theirs would not be paraded about like Sussex show ponies. There were plenty of cool, funky children they could take as their template.

or what their lives would be like child-free:
They could buy a holiday home abroad. Two. One on each hemisphere if that is what would make her happy. He racks his mind to think of the childless couples they know – not the kids from the office; guys their age and older – but cannot dredge any up. In their immediate circle, there are no trailblazers, only conformists. No matter. They are taste makers, she and him. They can set the precedent.

As with McEwan, though, I found these characters difficult to warm to. Amal and Claud both struck me as joyless corporate drones, preoccupied with status, their world devoid of beauty and pleasure. A technically adroit book, but not for me.

Aziz Ansari, Modern Romance, 2015

Aug. 17th, 2017 10:01 am
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I loved Aziz Ansari in Parks and Recreation and I revere his own series, Master of None. The "Thanksgiving" episode of Master of None is one of the best things I have ever seen on television. So I picked up Modern Romance with some enthusiasm.

In a classic Tom Haverford move, rather than just write the obligatory you-have-succeeded-as-a-comedian-on-TV book (Bossypants, Girl Walks Into a Bar, I'm Just a Person, Paddle Your Own Canoe, Self-Inflicted Wounds, The Bedwetter, Yes Please... yeah, it's a genre), Ansari teamed up with Stanford sociologist Eric Klinenberg to figure out both why technologically-mediated dating is such an unrelieved horror show and, reading between the lines, why Ansari was finding it difficult to meet a nice woman.

The resulting book reminded me a bit of Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything in that it's as curious and interesting as it is funny. Ansari's quizzical sweetness shines especially in his reporting on the specific dating scenes in Buenos Aires, Doha, Paris and Tokyo.
In Japan, posting any pictures of yourself, especially selfie-style photos, comes off as really douchey. Kana, an attractive, single twenty-nine-year-old, remarked: “All the foreign people who use selfies on their profile pic? The Japanese feel like that’s so narcissistic.” In her experience, pictures on dating sites would generally include more than two people. Sometimes the person wouldn’t be in the photo at all. I asked what they would post instead.

“A lot of Japanese use their cats,” she said.

“They’re not in the photo with the cat?” I asked.

“Nope. Just the cat. Or their rice cooker.”

“I once saw a guy posted a funny street sign,” volunteered Rinko, thirty-three. “I felt like I could tell a lot about the guy from looking at it.”

This kind of made sense to me. If you post a photo of something interesting, maybe it gives some sense of your personality? I showed a photo of a bowl of ramen I had taken earlier in the day and asked what she thought of that as a profile picture. She just shook her head. OH, I GUESS I CAN’T HOLD A CANDLE TO THAT STREET SIGN DUDE, HUH?

For me, the most engaging part of the book was seeing insights that later ended up as jokes in Master of None. I endorse and seek to emulate this kind of creative reuse! As for meeting a nice woman, the gossip rags tell me that Ansari was in a relationship with pastrychef Courtney McBloom for a while, but they parted amicably last year. So it goes.

Question thread #55

Aug. 15th, 2017 11:58 pm
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It's time for another question thread!

The rules:

- You may ask any dev-related question you have in a comment. (It doesn't even need to be about Dreamwidth, although if it involves a language/library/framework/database Dreamwidth doesn't use, you will probably get answers pointing that out and suggesting a better place to ask.)
- You may also answer any question, using the guidelines given in To Answer, Or Not To Answer and in this comment thread.

This Week in Fandom, Volume 59

Aug. 15th, 2017 03:09 pm
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This Week in Fandom

This Week in Fandom: Hugo Awards wins for women of colour, casting news for the Good Omens tv series, and more: https://goo.gl/ehCxxZ

2017 Election Results

Aug. 14th, 2017 06:04 pm
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OTW contested election banner




The Elections Committee is proud to present the following new Directors: Claire P. Baker, Danielle Strong, and Jessie Camboulives. Learn more here: https://goo.gl/tr4ej4
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Fandom Haven Story Archive banner




The Fandom Haven Story Archive, a multifandom fanfiction archive, is being imported to AO3. Learn more here: https://goo.gl/9KSKtf

The Summer Prince

Aug. 13th, 2017 11:38 am
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[personal profile] yatima has been carrying all the water around here, and shouldn't have to.

Earlier this week, I finished Alaya Dawn Johnson's The Summer Prince. I have had this book by my bed for months and months and months. I would pick it up, read some, like it, and then get distracted. Finally, I decided it was too good for that kind of treatment and got serious about moving through it.

It is an excellent and fascinating book, even though it never really grabbed me. The worldbuilding is awesome and the depiction of the inner lives of teenagers, affected by the different world they live in and nonetheless completely recognizable as the teenagers of our times, is especially well done. The The prose is beautiful and the evocation of the city is outstanding. The setting is a post-apocalyptic Brazil and effectively everyone is (from our perspective) PoC; Johnson explores class divisions and to some extent national divisions, but the key cultural rift she explores is age.

I can't quite figure out why it didn't have momentum for me, and I expect that will be different for other people. I found it well worth the comparatively slow going, and will probably re-read it at some point. 



Five Things Chien Said

Aug. 13th, 2017 12:38 pm
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[personal profile] otw_staff posting in [community profile] otw_news
Five Things an OTW Volunteer Said

In Five Things, Chien discusses life as an OTW volunteer without wifi, & how her work can be a conversation starter https://goo.gl/zSvj6r


1 link from Nicola Griffith

Aug. 13th, 2017 02:20 am
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[personal profile] sasha_feather posting in [community profile] access_fandom
Nicola Griffith:

An Open Letter to All Writing Programmes, Workshops, and Retreats (July 27, 2017)

https://nicolagriffith.com/2017/07/27/an-open-letter-to-all-writing-programmes-workshops-and-retreats

So here’s a public promise: after I have fulfilled my immediate contractual obligations, I will no longer support in any way any writing-related programme or organisation that does not have a public commitment to and specific timetable for becoming accessible. I will call on other writers to do the same.
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Australians of my generation have a particular reason to be fond of Journey to the West and it is the gloriously daft Japanese adaptation that was replayed endlessly on after-school TV. (For many queer Australians of my generation, myself included, Masako Natsume, the woman who played Tripitaka, is a pivotal figure in our secret lives.) The Monkey King resurfaces in Gene Luen Yang's graphic novel American Born Chinese, one of the books that taught my younger kid to read. (I was especially touched when in Yang's book, the three wise men who attended the birth of Jesus turned out to be Monkey and his friends Sandy and Pigsy. I'm a sucker for good crossover fanfic.)

All this to say that The Epic Crush of Genie Lo is yet another delightful take on Journey to the West, this time set in the hyper-competitive high schools of the Bay Area. Monkey is now Quentin, a handsome, short, brilliant and very annoying teenager who kept reminding me of Miles Vorkosigan, in a good way. Genie herself has a surprising connection with him, but is a three-dimensional character in her own right, with a sense of honor and complicated relationships with her parents and friends. Her efforts to balance college applications with supernatural obligations had a Buffy-ish resonance, and the various Gods and demons showing up in modern America will please Neil Gaiman fans. I found this a quick and enjoyable read.
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"Welcome to the Middle-Aged Orphans Club," writes Sherman Alexie, and as a middle-aged orphan myself, I did feel welcome, and seen, and understood. In July, Alexie cancelled part of his book tour because of complicated grief and being haunted by his late mother: "I don’t believe in ghosts," he writes. "But I see them all the time." Me too, brother.

Like Bad Indians, this is an intricate quilt of a book, part memoir, part poem, part dream. It's hard to imagine how it could be otherwise. The loss of a parent is a loss of meaning. For indigenous people, this is doubly true. Lillian Alexie was one of the last fluent speakers of Salish. Her death robs her son, and the world, of an entire universe.

This book, like Hawking radiation, is an almost-undetectable glow of meaning escaping from a black hole. If you haven't lost a parent yet it might be too much to bear, but if you have, it might feel like joining a group of survivors around a campfire after a catastrophe.

IN AUGUST 2015, as a huge forest fire burned on my reservation, as it burned within feet of the abandoned uranium mine, the United States government sent a representative to conduct a town hall to address the growing concerns and fears. My sister texted me the play-by-play of the meeting. “OMG!” she texted. “The government guy just said the USA doesn’t believe the forest fire presents a serious danger to the Spokane Indian community, even if the fire burns right through the uranium mine.”

...“Is the air okay?” I texted. “It hurts a little to breathe,” my sister texted back. “But we’re okay.” Jesus, I thought, is there a better and more succinct definition of grief than It hurts a little to breathe, but we’re okay?

[admin post] Admin Post: Holy moly, Hugo Awards!

Aug. 12th, 2017 03:43 pm
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We won a Hugo Award for Best Fanzine!

Ira and Susan on stage giving a speech with text overlaid reading This was a triumph. I'm making a note here: HUGE SUCCESS


Ira and Susan attended Worldcon 75 on our behalf (we can't even with our jealousy over Ira getting to meet Daveed Diggs). We're so grateful to everyone who nominated and voted for us this year. Thanks also to our fellow finalists, too. It was lovely being a part of a robust ballot featuring commentary and criticism from a wide range of voices. The full list of finalists and winners can be read at thehugoawards.org.

We're still reeling a bit, but we wanted to at least reach out and say THANK YOU and OMG and WHAT and THANK YOU OMG, etc. We are super honored and so excited! Congrats to US, congrats to the other winners, and thanks for liking our work! ♥ You can find the text of our speech below.

Thanks so much for this amazing award. We accept on behalf of ourselves and the four Lady Business editors who couldn't be here tonight: Clare, Jodie, KJ, and Renay.

We also want to thank everyone who has supported Lady Business throughout the years in ways large and small, including our readers, commenters, and guest columnists. Special thanks go out to John Scalzi, whose work welcomed Renay back to science fiction. Without his books Renay wouldn't have been in the SF community to start this project with our co-founders, Ana and Jodie. Thanks to Ana Grilo of The Book Smugglers for consistent support and writing opportunities, Kate Elliott and Justin Landon for believing in our work and being the best cheerleaders, and Zachariah Carlson for being our personal Shadow Broker all these years.

When Lady Business was founded, the goal was to create a safer space for discussions in a community that was still struggling to recognize white women, much less any other marginalized identities. There's still work to be done, and change has been slow, but we are thrilled our project has been a voice within this cultural shift. We are incredibly honored that the Hugo voters find our intersectional feminist work valuable, and we will keep working to remain worthy of your recognition as we move forward.

We dedicate this award to Jodie Baker and Ana Silva. Thank you very much.
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Not exhaustive, but it's been that kind of summer...

HBO’s upcoming Confederate generated some recent refs. For The New York Times, Roxane Gay wrote I Don’t Want to Watch Slavery Fan Fiction. Emily Yahr wrote in The Washington Post that The backlash about the idea of “slavery fan fiction” was immediate, and many wondered what HBO was thinking — particularly because “Game of Thrones” has come under fire for its portrayals of race and violence. And, For Chicago Tribune, Nina Metz noted There are a number of reasons — thoughtful, well-researched reasons — why people are objecting to a premise that sounds like slavery fan fiction.

More Confederate-related refs )

In 'What would happen if Hamlet were a girl in the Internet age?' for The Washington Post, Celia Wren wrote that The Elsinore-prowling man in black becomes Elsie, an Internet-roaming teenage girl in black, in "To Tell My Story: A Hamlet Fan¬fic," an ingenious, if sometimes strenuously jokey, new play by Alexandra Petri. (Petri is a writer for the paper who’s produced more than her share of fanfic fanfic refs over the years.)

In a New Yorker review of Ben Blatt’s Nabokov’s Favorite Word Is Mauve: What the Numbers Reveal About the Classics, Bestsellers, and Our Own Writing, Dan Piepenbring wrote American writers of Harry Potter fan fiction are actually more liable to use “brilliant” than their British counterparts, who employ the word with native agility.

1D, Star Wars, Dah Bears, Wattpad )

Cosmoploitan’s Lilian Min wrote that This Jeopardy Love Story Is The Stuff of Fan Fiction.

From Ashley Eady for The Wrap: Bruce Willis ‘Death Wish’ Trailer Blasted as ‘Alt-Right Fan Fiction’.

Finally, The Macalope produced Wishful thinking: Alexa fan fiction for Macworld.

1 Link: Netflix's "Atypical"

Aug. 10th, 2017 10:58 pm
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[personal profile] sasha_feather posting in [community profile] access_fandom
Mickey Rowe at Teen Vogue:
"Netflix's "Atypical" Was a Major Disappointment for Autism Representation"

http://www.teenvogue.com/story/netflix-atypical-autism-representation

In watching the show, I noticed that it seems to play into stereotypes that I’ve experienced firsthand that could have easily been avoided and that may present damaging information about autistic people. There is so much misinformation about autism in part because we nearly always learn about autism from non-autistic people, instead of learning about autism from autistic adults.

Nonverbal Communication in SF

Aug. 10th, 2017 04:55 pm
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[personal profile] jesse_the_k posting in [community profile] access_fandom
Seems like the "Universal Translators" are always auditory, eh?

Lynne Thomas of Uncanny Magazine writes about her daughter Caitlin, who doesn't speak and communicates a lot. Lynne reviews the overwhelming privilege of the spoken word in SF:

https://www.themarysue.com/caitlin-is-not-groot/

One of the commenters points out that Marvel has a new, nonverbal, hero coming:

http://comicbook.com/marvel/2017/08/04/inhumans-black-bolt-communicates-through-medusa/

Sidetracks - August 10, 2017

Aug. 10th, 2017 11:07 am
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Sidetracks Template


Sidetracks is a collaborative project featuring various essays, videos, reviews, or other Internet content that we want to share with each other. All past and current links for the Sidetracks project can be found in our Sidetracks tag. For more links and commentary you can follow us on Twitter, Tumblr. You can also support us on Patreon.


Read more... )

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